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Xicanx: Dreamers + Changemakers

Jun 7–Sep 8, 2024

Image Gallery

Xicanx: Dreamers + Changemakers

Jun 7–Sep 8, 2024

The artists in this exhibition are dreamers and changemakers. Of Mexican-American origin, they self-identify as Xicanx, a term that crosses national borders and gender lines to encompass the Chicano people’s multi-generational experiences of social difference.

These artists are part of a rich tradition of combining visual art and activism. Some began their work as part of El Movimiento, the Chicano civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s that had its roots in the United States. Others define themselves as Indigenous, drawing upon their origins in Aztlán, the ancestral homeland referenced in Mexican códices and oral histories. The next generation is expanding the idea of Xicanx art while continuing the work of addressing personal, social, and political issues.

The fight by Xicanx artists for social justice is not yet over. It remains as vital today as when El Movimiento first began.

Xicanx: Dreamers + Changemakers was originally presented by MOA and ARENET and curated by Jill Baird, former Curator of Education, MOA; Greta de Léon, Executive Director, ARENET. The presentation at Contemporary at Blue Star has been organized in collaboration with Mary Heathcott, Executive Director Contemporary at Blue Star; Jacqueline Saragoza McGilvray, Curator and Exhibitions Director, Contemporary at Blue Star; and Jon Hinjosa, Xicanx Project Director, ARENET. The exhibition will be accompanied by an exhibition opening June 7, 2024 6-9pm, public programs, and a Xicanx month symposium, August 2024. Visit our events for a calendar of upcoming programs.

Visit the Xicanx website–part catalog, part archive, part resource center

*This exhibition uses the term Xicanx to refer to Chicano, Chicana and Chicanx. The term reflects those who fought for and claim this designation and incorporates the ‘X’ from the Spanish transcription of the Nahuatl sound ‘ch’. Nahuatl is one of the major Indigenous languages in Mexico. The ‘x’ on the end signals gender-neutral and non-binary inclusivity.